Archive for August, 2010

Local Urban League and eugenic founded organization whose founder gave Klan speeches host “family event”

Posted in Black Genocide, Planned Parenthood, Urban League with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 31, 2010 by saynsumthn

Titled by the media as : Family Fun Challenge Day at Columbus Park

Monday was the second annual Family Fun Challenge held by Planned Parenthood and the Broome County Urban League.

The free event featured arts and crafts,food, and games.

Several other social service agencies were also there, providing interactive games to “help foster family communication.”

One African American Women told the news media that, ” “It opened up my eyes on certain things that I really didn’t know about, you know, and to help other people know what their children, if something goes wrong I have like a pamphlet to show them like this is what’s going on, you need to go get help.” said Tonia Benjamin

But- I have to wonder if this woman knows the history of Planned Parenthood and their racist and eugenic roots. Perhaps if the Urban League educated her on this- she’d have her eyes opened in a whole new direction.

Does she know that in 1962, the National Urban Leaguerescinded its support of contraception, and so did many local NAACP chapters and that twenty-eight percent of the Blacks surveyed in the late 1960’s agreed that “ encouraging blacks to use birth control is comparable to trying to eliminate this group from society” (Source Medical Apartheid, by Harriet Washington)

In 1962 Marvin Davies, head of the Florida NAACP, rejected contraception as black genocide directed at them.

One Urban League leader, Whitney Young, revoked his group’s support of contraception and in 1963- Whitney M. Young, Jr. Executive Director, National Urban League, explained why blacks are suspicious of family planning, “Let me conclude by trying to explain why many Negro citizens are either suspicious of the motives of family planners or why they are reluctant to make the program a sole responsibility of public institutions, and are sometimes less enthusiastic about the program…First, the administrators of most public institutions are political appointees. It is a rare exception when a Negro is ever represented at policy level, and in some states the top administrators are well known racists..Second , since so few of the proponents of family planning including [Planned Parenthood] PPFA, are ever prominently identified fighting the basic problem of discrimination and segregation …either as individuals or through established agencies …many interpret this interest in family planning as designed more to control population expansion in this particular racial group and to reduce taxes, than to achieve a humane and social goal..

In a letter addressed to Planned Parenthood President, to Alan F. Guttmacher in 1966, one Connecticut Planned Parenthood associate admonished Guttmacher at how shocked he was to learn that blacks opposed their group “ Since the luncheon phase of the last board meeting I have been very much concerned. I do not know if your report was the bombshell to the others that it was to me, but the fact that the Urban League, NAACP, etc. were actively and vocally naming PP*WP [Planned Parenthood-World Population] a racist organization shocked me. I remember as long ago as 1935 hearing the then Catholic inspired reaction from the Negro community, “The whites want to keep our numbers down so they can rule us.” However, to hear this view point promulgated in 1966 by the leaders of the Negro group was a shock. More upsetting was the apparent acquiescent nod of the PP*WP spokesperson to the accusation. We can and should admit that our efforts have been geared toward the low socio-economic segment of the population-and probably the Negro population more than others…As to Negro board membership- Should a person be elected to the board because his skin is brown or yellow? Isn’t this also racism? Do the leaders of the Negro community have the time to give to Planned Parenthood over and above their other commitments? Let’s put the burden of cure on them and ask the leadership of the NAACP, CORE, the Urban League, etc. to submit names of qualified people to our nominating committee on the same basis as our affiliates…If we tell our story and stick to our viewpoint often enough we will be believed.

Then in on June 11,1970, The Black Caucus issued a statement of withdraw from the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment,
The Black Caucus has withdrawn from the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment because of unmistakably clear evidence that the purpose of this conference is to use these delegates invited to legitimize a preconceived vicious plan of extermination. This plan is one of systematic reduction of a specific population, namely Blacks, other non-whites, the American poor and certain non-white and ethnic immigrants.” The statement was presented to a Press Conference by Felton Alexander, National Urban League and chairman of the Black Caucus and Dr. Alyce Gullattee, Psychiatrist from Washington D.C.

A 1971 Planned Parenthood World Population memorandum issued to: Alan F. Guttmacher and John C. Robbins from Douglas Stewart, contained an article from Muhammed Speaks dated September 10, 1971. Stewart writes, “ The Community Affairs Committee members and staff are devising appropriate means of dealing with this communication problem. It must be noted that, thus far, the dialogue is not affecting the utilization of family planning services in the Black Community.”
The Article from Muhammad Speaks is entitled, “New Population Control Program disguised as ‘preventative medicine’,“ It exposes the fact that blacks were Upset by growing awareness that the imbalance between funds for population control and funds for health, housing, and education is a sign of a genocidal policy. It stated that the rich whites who want to reduce the Black population are coming up with population control disguised as “comprehensive health” programs, and read , “Muhammad Speaks learned from a [Urban] League source who objects to the program that the League is seeking a grant to try a “new approach to family planning outreach and follow up. The main trick in this “new approach” is to pretend to parents that infant mortality, mental retardation, malnutrition, poor education, poor housing and other real problems suffered by black citizens are caused by so-called overpopulation… The program which the League is embracing is, in the words of the proposal itself only an effort “to update and broaden” the attack against the Black population launched by the Rockefellers and other multi-billionaries whose sole interest is to reduce the number of US citizens seeking wages from the business enterprises run in the sole interest of a few wealthy whites. To participate in this genocide, to give it a Black “Stamp of approval” , the League and the well-known “revolutionary party” have joined in the grant proposal with the US Food and Drug Administration ( pill and IUD dispensers)…and other organizations that have never been known for their concern for the health of Black people.”

Suspicion of Planned Parenthood as an agent of Black Genocide did not end in the 60’s and 70’s – in fact, records now open from Planned Parenthood’s founding reveal that their board was full of American Eugenics Society Members and Margaret Sanger was buddies with the Klan and even admitted that she gave speeches to them in her autobiography.

A documentary has gathered much of this information together- it is called Maafa21 and it will reveal the proof that abortion, Planned Parenthood, and population control are all efforts at slowing the black population. I recommend that the Urban League referenced in the story above get a coy of Maafa21 before they link arks with the eugenics Planned Parenthood again !

Black Powers collide: Black minister and black activist defend Beck’s “Restoring Honor” rally

Posted in Abortion, Black Conservative, Glenn Beck, Ted Hayes with tags , , , , , , , , , , on August 31, 2010 by saynsumthn

My challenge to the race hustlers
Exclusive: Mychal Massie invites tea-party-dissing black ‘leaders’ to debate him publicly

________________________________________
Posted: August 31, 2010
1:00 am Eastern


By Mychal Massie
________________________________________
At a press conference sponsored by the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice, Walter Fauntroy blasted Glenn Beck’s “Restoring Honor” rally and said the Ku Klux Klan and the tea party have to be “used interchangeably.”

He continued, “Conservatives of this country have declared war on the civil-rights movement of the ’60s that brought together a coalition of conscience of people of every race, creed and color for a march on jobs and freedom.”

First of all, Fauntroy should acquaint himself with factual history. It was the Democratic Party, which he belongs to, that founded the Ku Klux Klan. Secondly, as long as he and liberal Democrats are offended that Beck would have his rally on the same date and venue as Dr. King’s march, they should explore another piece of factual history.

The Ku Klux Klan was founded on Dec. 24, 1865. Shouldn’t he, as a minister, be offended that the party he belongs to and shills for founded a terrorist hate group whose expressed purpose was to terrorize, intimidate and murder Jews, Blacks, Catholics and whosoever else they would, on the sacred eve of Christ’s birth? As a minister, which should be more offensive, Beck’s rally or that tidbit of fact?

But it’s not about date and venue at all. His vitriol (along with the same from others) is the apoplectic, knee-jerk hysteria intended to foment discord where none exists and none was intended. Furthermore, I find it indefensible that his malevolent and divisive diatribes are presented by the media without contradiction or an addressing of the facts.

Erik Rush’s brand new book is bold, daring and needed: “Negrophilia: From Slave Block to Pedestal – America’s Racial Obsession”

Specific to that point, I say it’s time for the likes of Fauntroy, Marc Morial of the National Urban League and Al Sharpton to defend their rhetoric. Over the years, I have quietly offered to debate these types – now I throw down the gauntlet and publicly challenge them. I will personally secure a venue to debate any one, or all of them together, pursuant to the legitimacy of their comments. After all, perhaps they have been misquoted or taken out of context. Perhaps they intended to say something else.

I challenge these men to defend their remarks and publicly explain how the tea party compares to a segregationist terror group started by Democrats. I challenge Marc Morial to openly explain, in a debate format, why the Beck rally was “insulting” and a “hijacking of the imagery and symbolism” of Aug. 28 and the Lincoln Memorial?
The tea party is a joining together of persons from all political parties. It epitomizes the very thing Fauntroy readily acknowledged that the 1963 march did – it brings together people of conscience of the every race, creed and color to march for jobs and the restoration of constitutional freedoms.

It is time they were called to, not only explain, but stand under the microscope of public debate and demonstrate how their Erebusic rhetoric binds together the fabric of the American community.

I call upon the media to assist me in my effort. The media are quick to parrot every word these so-called civil-rights leaders say that is antagonistic and divisive. In the interest of fair reporting, let them be equally quick to insist that they accept my challenge.

Let Fauntroy explain under the scrutiny of debate how he can be so quick to condemn people for joining together – fighting to bring our country back to its roots – while supporting those responsible for the murder of more than one-third of the present black population through abortion. Let him explain how he calls himself a minister, a reputed man of God, and encourage people to commit murder.

Religious beliefs may allow one to focus on being a community rabble-rouser, i.e., organizer – but as a minister, the Word of God calls one to focus on soul-winning, spreading the Word of God and making disciples, i.e., those who will follow after Christ.

Fauntroy, Morial and Sharpton are brave attackers in the comfort of their minions – but my challenge is now on the table to see if they have the collective backbone to face me in a debate. It’s easy to throw stones from behind a fence, but let them step out and defend themselves publicly.

After all, it’s just little ol’ me. They can’t be afraid to face me in a debate. Fauntroy and Sharpton are former presidential candidates, and Morial is certainly accustomed to making accusations from the secure confines of the National Urban League. Here is their chance to defend their convictions, in a public forum, against a lowly essayist such as myself.

C’mon boys, are you going to step up, or are you cowards talking loud and saying nothing, for the sake of fomenting discord?

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Ted Hayes Debates Rev. Eric Lee on Glenn Becks …, posted with vodpod

Ted Hayes is also speaking about the black genocide issue – Watch

The Elite’s are NOT Pro-black watch Maafa21 – The film features a number of Black leaders:

Black Leader Comments on Glenn Beck Rally and Dr. King’s Speech

WASHINGTON, Aug. 30 /Christian Newswire/ — Day Gardner, President of the National Black Pro-Life Union, submits the following and is available for comment:

I can’t explain what I felt as I watched Dr. Alveda King bounding down the steps of the Lincoln Memorial steps to deliver her speech, “I Too, Have a Dream.”

In the moments before I was introduced, I was taken back 47 years to when I was eight years old. I remember that day vividly–sitting on the floor, my back leaning against my father’s chair. My eyes were glued to the television. Dr. Martin Luther King had become my hero, he was a deliverer. Even then, my parents seemed worried about his future–would someone try to silence this man of God? Unfortunately, it did happen –we all lost him.

Eventually, it became evident we had to strive to make “the dream” a reality so that Dr. King’s death would not be in vain. We became energized for a few seasons, I think. The world was changing and black Americans knew that if they stayed the course–they might just get there. Many of the Black clergy awkwardly stepped forward in an attempt to fill the void left by Dr. King and his murdered brother Rev. A.D. King; but it never happened.

The Reverend Jesse Jackson tried and was believable for awhile as his star began to rise with “I am somebody” and his powerful writings against abortion.

More and more black ministers wanted the adulation Dr. King had, as they all vied for his coveted “leadership” role.

Growing up, I was saddened to see them drop like flies–becoming sell-outs to immorality. Sidelining their worship of God, many chose power, greed and money instead. Men of God became less and less Godly–some became God-less.

Jesse Jackson, the once adamant supporter of all children born and unborn–switched tracks to board the abortion train. That train has brutally killed more than 50 million children since 1973–more than 17 million black children. He became part of America’s downfall.

On August 28, 2010, the 47th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s historical speech, I find myself standing beside his niece, Dr. Alveda King as she delivered her amazing speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. My eyes welled–a lump formed–this is what her uncle saw! Looking out over the mall into thousands and thousands of faces, Alveda, my black brothers and sisters and I stood in solidarity–in unity. From the Lincoln Memorial, past the Washington Monument, as far as the eye could see in any direction, American people of all colors stood shoulder to shoulder to honor the one true God–to show love for our great country, a country founded on the Solid Rock which is the word of God–to fix the places where we are broken–to help the weathered masses–to see the humanity of unborn children–to heal the terrible hurts–to lift each other up and to never stand down until the “dream” is restored and I was there.

Ted Hayes Debates Rev. Eric Lee on Glenn Becks Restoring Honor Rally in Washington DC

Posted in Black Conservative, Black Pastor, Glenn Beck, Ted Hayes with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on August 31, 2010 by saynsumthn

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Ted Hayes Debates Rev. Eric Lee on Glenn Becks …, posted with vodpod

Ted Hayes is also speaking about the black genocide issue – Watch

The Elite’s are NOT Pro-black watch Maafa21

King son finds common ground with Beck

Posted in Glenn Beck, Racism with tags , , , , , , , on August 31, 2010 by saynsumthn

Washington Post

By Hamil R. Harris

Martin Luther King III thanked Glenn Beck and leaders of the “Restoring Honor” rally for honoring his father on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial Saturday and King hopes that there can be dialogue between civil rights leaders and Beck’s followers.

“I would like to see both communities working together to make America a better place because whether one is Republican or Democrat, Tea Party or independent,” King said in an interview after he closed out the March. “What is relevant is that together we can roll up our sleeves to make America better.”

Watch Video here

King III was the final speaker during the “Reclaim the Dream” march that ended with participants being greeted by those who participated in the Beck rally at the Lincoln Memorial. As the marchers filed past each other, greets, information and even bottles of water were exchanged.

“Bless y’all,” said Kathryn Travis as she watched the King marchers file past her as she left the memorial grounds. “I think that it is good that we can disagree but we can still love each other.”

While many of the speakers at the “Reclaim the Dream” rally condemned Beck for hosting an event on the 47th anniversary of his father’s speech, King III said nobody can hijack his father’s message.

“The way they paid tribute to my dad created a context for a dialogue,” King said, adding that he looks forward the day when “we will be close to no longer having to sing ‘We Shall Overcome,’ but we can stand and sing ‘we have overcome.’ ”

After the march, King III, said “I feel very proud and humbled that 47 years after my dad delivered the speech that people around the nation are mobilized around what Martin Luther King Jr. represented. It is an incredible feeling.”

War Against The Weak – Walter Ashby Plecker

Posted in Abortion, Eugenics, Racism, Walte Ashby with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on August 31, 2010 by saynsumthn

Walter Ashby Plecker, the first registrar of Virginia’s Bureau of Vital Statistics, starting in 1912, forced Indians to classify
themselves as black. The tribes, he said, had become a “mongrel” mixture.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

War Against The Weak – Plecker, posted with vodpod

According to the stunning eugenics film- Maafa21, “in 1935, in one incident alone, the Nazis sterilized the children of over 600 German women because their children had been fathered by black men. When this event was reported in the United States, a member of the American Eugenics Society named Walter Ashby Plecker wrote a letter to the German Bureau of Human Betterment and Eugenics praising them for the action and expressing his hope that not one child had been missed. Ten years earlier, Plecker had written that African-Americans were “the greatest problem and most destructive force which confronts the white race and American civilization.”

Plecker once stated, “As much as we held in esteem individual Negroes this esteem was not of a character that would tolerate marriage with them, though as we know now to our sorrow much illegitimate mixture has occurred.” Plecker added, “If you desire to do the correct thing for the negro race … inspire (them) with the thought that the birth of mulatto children is a standing disgrace.”

Plecker strongly supported sterilization laws, arguing that feeble-minded whites were prone to mate with Indians and blacks. He had no role in administering the law, however.

Plecker was convinced that mulatto offspring would slowly seep into the white race. “Like rats when you’re not watching,” they “have been sneaking in their birth certificates through their own midwives, giving either Indian or white racial classification,” Plecker wrote.

He called them “the breach in the dike.” They had to be stopped.

In 1932, Plecker gave a keynote speech at the Third International Conference on Eugenics in New York. Among those in attendance was Ernst Rudin of Germany who, 11 months later, would help write Hitler’s eugenics law. Rudin was also published in Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger’s publication: The Birth Control Review.

Rudin and Plecker are part of the elite plan to exterminate blacks. That plot is detailed in the film Maafa21 (Trailer below)

Toddler survives stare-down with Bengal tiger

Posted in Animal Lovers with tags , , , on August 31, 2010 by saynsumthn

Congressional Black Caucus member accused of favoritism in dispensing scholarship money to relatives

Posted in Politics with tags , , , , , on August 31, 2010 by saynsumthn

Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson violated rules, steered scholarships to relatives

10:28 AM CDT on Monday, August 30, 2010

By TODD J. GILLMAN and CHRISTY HOPPE / The Dallas Morning News

Longtime Dallas congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson has awarded thousands of dollars in college scholarships to four relatives and a top aide’s two children since 2005, using foundation funds set aside for black lawmakers’ causes.

The recipients were ineligible under anti-nepotism rules of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, which provided the money. And all of the awards violated a foundation requirement that scholarship winners live or study in a caucus member’s district.

Johnson, a Democrat, denied any favoritism when asked about the scholarships last week. Two days later, she acknowledged in a statement released by her office that she had violated the rules but said she had done so “unknowingly” and would work with the foundation to “rectify the financial situation.”

Initially, she said, “I recognized the names when I saw them. And I knew that they had a need just like any other kid that would apply for one.” Had there been more “very worthy applicants in my district,” she added, “then I probably wouldn’t have given it” to the relatives.

Her handling of the scholarships puts a rare spotlight on the program and how it is overseen. Caucus members have great leeway in how they pick winners and how aggressively they publicize the awards. Some lawmakers promote the program online, for instance, while Johnson does not.

Philanthropy experts said such lax oversight of scholarship money doesn’t match the standards for charities.

The foundation – which is supported by private and corporate donations, not taxpayer money – provides $10,000 annually for each member of the Congressional Black Caucus to award in scholarships. Each gets to decide how many ways to split the money and whether to create a judging panel, choose personally or delegate the task.
Johnson, a former chairwoman of the caucus who has served on the board that oversees the foundation, said she wasn’t fully aware of the program rules and emphasized that she didn’t “personally benefit.”

In her interview with The Dallas Morning News, on Wednesday, Johnson said “hundreds of kids got scholarships since I have been here.” Her district covers much of southern Dallas County, including many of the area’s less affluent precincts.

“The most that any kid normally gets is from $1,000 to $1,200. … If it was a secret or if I was trying to hide it, I wouldn’t have done it,” she said.
The foundation’s general counsel, Amy Goldson, said Saturday that the scholarships Johnson awarded violated eligibility rules regarding relatives and residency and are “of great concern.”

The program “operates on an honor system,” so the foundation hadn’t known that money went to Johnson’s relatives, she said. But when a recipient fails to meet eligibility requirements or “misrepresents their eligibility, the scholarship funds must be returned.”

Further, Goldson said, the failure of a lawmaker or aides to follow eligibility rules “is a violation of the letter and spirit of [the Foundation’s] requirements.”

“It is inappropriate for a lawmaker to certify the award of a scholarship to a relative in a situation where the lawmaker or their staff is involved in the selection of the recipient,” she said.

Apart from the residency requirements, the scholarship rules state that students must have a 2.5-grade-point average, but there are no explicit judging criteria.
Johnson awarded nine to 11 scholarships a year from 2005 to 2008, the most recent years for which information was available. Each of those years, three or four winners were related to her or her district director, Rod Givens. Johnson said she divided the available funds equally among recipients, and every qualified applicant got a scholarship.

The foundation asks applicants to certify that they aren’t related to those associated with the caucus or the foundation, but it does not specify which relationships that includes.

Scholarships have gone to two of the congresswoman’s grandsons, Kirk and David Johnson; to two of her great-nephews, Gregory and Preston Moore; and to Givens’ son and daughter. Givens did not respond to requests for comment, and none of the scholarship recipients could be reached.

‘Not … proper’

Daniel Borochoff, president of the American Institute of Philanthropy, said that, ideally, scholarship and grant decisions should be made by disinterested arbiters, preferably on the basis of excellence or need.

Johnson’s system “is not an appropriate or proper way to distribute scholarship funds,” he said.

“It’s totally fine if the congressman or -woman wants to reach inside their own pocket and give, but to use money that people got tax deductions on to then benefit their family – it would just be setting up nonprofit organizations to get tax benefits to put their kids through college. It would wreck the whole system if that kind of thing were allowed,” Borochoff said.

He said a scholarship with so few criteria for recipients would normally attract dozens if not hundreds of applicants if it were well publicized.

“There should be outrage because there are probably students who are more deserving and more needy of the funds,” Borochoff said.

The combined scholarship total for the six students over four years was less than $20,000, based on Johnson’s accounting of the scholarships. That appears to be less than half the total Johnson awarded over that time. Of 43 scholarships her office awarded between 2005 and 2008, 15 went to relatives of Johnson or Givens, according to foundation annual reports.

Johnson, in the interview Wednesday, dismissed concerns about the propriety of giving to her relatives or her staffers.

“We look at the kids that apply, look at their qualifications, and if they have the application there with all the ingredients, we try to help,” she said. “I doubt if there is anybody in my district going to question me giving $1,000 to a kid to help him with college.”

The congresswoman, 74, who is expected to handily win a 10th term this fall over a relatively unknown Republican, said flatly that there was no favoritism for her aide’s children or for her grandsons or great-nephews.

“Same application. Same requirements,” she said.

Rules clear, lawyer says

The Congressional Black Caucus consists of one U.S. senator and 41 House members – among them Johnson and two other Texans, Reps. Sheila Jackson Lee and Al Green, both of Houston. All are Democrats.

The foundation is a separate, nonprofit charitable organization whose board at any time includes only a few caucus members.

The foundation, which awarded $716,000 to 556 students last year, has been criticized for spending less on scholarships than on galas and conferences that allow lobbyists to rub elbows with influential lawmakers. Fundraising for the caucus itself and its members is tightly regulated, but the closely related foundation faces few restrictions.

In 2002, Johnson chaired the caucus and served on its board.

She continued to serve on the foundation board through 2005 – a year when both great-nephews and grandson Kirk Johnson received scholarships through her office, despite a rule explicitly forbidding awards to relatives of foundation board members.

Goldson, the foundation attorney, said the rules make clear that applicants cannot be related to any member of the black caucus, the foundation’s staff, directors, members of its corporate advisory council or any sponsor, a list that includes scores of major companies. “Any misrepresentation will result in disqualification of the application,” she said.

Each caucus member who participates in the foundation’s scholarship program is responsible for publicizing the competition locally. Some do so more aggressively than others. Many list the opportunity on their official U.S. House websites, often under a tab dedicated to “students.”

Johnson’s website makes no mention of the scholarships.

“This has been going on long before there was any websites,” she said. “We send information to the high schools. I haven’t known anybody who didn’t know about it, to tell you the truth.”

Counselors at four southern Dallas high schools didn’t return calls last week to discuss the matter.

Selection process varies

The foundation raises the funds, sets requirements and provides application forms. But the process for picking winners varies among lawmakers.

Apart from the GPA of at least 2.5, students must submit personal and financial information, a transcript, letters of recommendation, an essay on goals, and a copy of their federal student aid report to their local member of the Congressional Black Caucus.

Johnson said aides in Dallas – where Givens is her senior aide – review applications and forward to her all those that qualify.

“When they come to this office, there’s hardly much decision to be made. We find out how many applicants, how much money, divide it up, send it in,” she said. “I’ve not given any money where there was no need. And I don’t think a $1,000 scholarship’s going to do too much, but it helps when you need it.”

Johnson’s assets – not counting a blind trust that owns a newsstand concession at Dallas Love Field – amounted to less than $97,000 in 2008. Her wealth puts her in the bottom quarter of House members, according to Center for Responsive Politics data. Apart from her $174,000-a-year congressional salary, she reported a $35,000 pension for her previous service in the state Legislature, and $22,000 from Social Security last year.

In doling out their scholarship money, some lawmakers pick one winner, others as many as 18.

Johnson gave out nine scholarships in 2005, 11 in 2006 and 10 in 2007. Every qualified applicant got a piece of the pie, she said, though her office did not provide details on the number of applications submitted each year.

Johnson said she never asked the foundation or anyone else if it was acceptable for her to award scholarships to relatives.

“It’s never come up with me,” she said. “But let me just say this: None of these people are my immediate family. Immediate family doesn’t include grandchildren.”
‘As best I could’

But the Johnsons, Moores and Givenses weren’t eligible under other foundation rules requiring recipients to reside or go to school in a congressional district represented by a member of the Congressional Black Caucus.

None of the six lived or attended school in Johnson’s district. They lived in districts represented by white Republicans.

Read the rest here

More here Relatives of lawmaker, aide got $25,000 in scholarships; Johnson vows to repay money